Steve Armstrong
Broker since 1979
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People ask me "why Flag Day?"  Well, as the story goes, when I attended school, the school year adjourned for the summer around the second week of June and my birthday is June 17th.  So, back then, I would check the calendar to see how many days until summer vacation and how many days until my birthday.  In doing so, I'd come across Flag Day, notated on the calendar every June 14th, but there never seemed to be any discussion about it.  I wondered why a date that was always on the calendar never received any attention.  So, when I was about 10 years old, I decided to take matters into my own hands and adopt Flag Day.  For decades, I've greeted friends, family and work associates wishing them a Happy Flag Day.  Over the years, it really caught on!  In fact, for me, this has been a great way to keep in touch with many people I wouldn't normally see or talk to over the course of a year, except on Flag Day, when I receive a phone calls, emails and texts wishing ME a Happy Flag DaySmile 

Personally, June is a wonderful month.  As a father of 2 adult boys, I celebrate in mid-June what I refer to as "my trifecta" Flag Day-June 14th, my birthday June 17th and Fathers Day on the 3rd Sunday of June.  

                                                      Below is the history of our flag and how Flag Day started

The current design of the U.S. flag is it's 26th since June 14th 1777.  The 48 star flag was in effect for 47 years until the 49 star version became official on July 4th 1959.  The 50 star flag was ordered by President Eisenhower on August 21st 1959 and was adopted in July 1960.  It is the longest-used version of the U.S. flag and has been in use for over 59+ years. In 2020, the flag of the United States will turn 243 years old-older than the U.S. Constitution.


Since the mid-1880's, Americans have honored our flag with local observance, including a Flag Day celebration in Chicago in 1894 that drew 300,000 people. In 1916, President Woodrow Wilson issued a proclamation establishing a national observance of Flag Day. A bill signed by President Harry Truman in 1949 codified the observance into law.

Please joining me in celebrating Flag Day. Let us take a moment to appreciate the history of our flag, our country and all those who have built it, sustained it, and contributed to its lasting legacy.